Abstract

Seventy-four patients, ranging in age from 15 to 50 and presenting with a moderate to severe dentofacial deformity requiring orthognathic surgery, were randomly assigned to a video imaging or a standard case presentation (CP) group. Motives for treatment did not differ significantly between the video image and standard CP groups. Two weeks after the case presentation, 60% of the standard CP group and 74% of the video image group ranked the anticipated change in facial appearance as an important factor in making a treatment decision. Seventy percent of the standard CP group and 83% of the video image group agreed with the statement that surgery would be necessary to correct their problem. In the standard CP group, 47% of the patients ranked dental casts as the most helpful physical record in making a treatment decision, and 46% said the acetate profile tracing was the most helpful tool for understanding what to expect from treatment. In the video imaging group, 42% of the patients said the video imaging presentation was the most helpful tool in making a treatment decision, and 39% of the patients said it was the most helpful tool for understanding treatment expectations. The proportion of patients in the video image case presentation group with elevated self-image expectations following treatment was significantly higher (P=.045) than in the standard case presentation group. The presentation of video images appears to be a valuable information source for conveying treatment options to patients, but caution may be needed to prevent elevated or possibly unrealistic treatment expectations.

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Author notes

Ceib Phillips is a research professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Brett J. Hill is in private practice in Charlotte, North Carolina

Christian Cannac is an orthodontic resident, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina