Abstract

Maximum bilateral bite force, determined in 129 dental students, was evaluated with regard to six skeletal and eight dental measurements acquired from conventional lateral cephalometric radiographs. Statistically significant correlations for three of the skeletal measurements were found. Maximum bite force increased with regard to decreasing mandibular plane/palatal plane angle and to decreasing mandibular plane angles. Maximum bite force increased with an increasing ratio of posterior facial height to anterior facial height. Significant statistical correlation for only one of the eight dental measurements was found: maximum bite force related directly with increasing maxillary and/or mandibular dentoalveolar heights, an unexpected finding.

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Author notes

S. Braun, clinical professor, Vanderbilt University and the University of Illinois

H.-P. Bantleon, professor, Universitätsklinik für Zahn-Mund-und Kieferheilkunde, Vienna, Austria

W.P. Hnat, associate professor, mechanical engineering, J. B. Speed Scientific School, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky

J.W. Freudenthaler, university professor, Universitätsklinik für Zahn-Mund-und Kieferheilkunde, Vienna, Austria

M.R. Marcotte is in private practice in Bristol, Connecticut

B.E. Johnson, Chairman, Department of Orthodontic, Pediatric and Geriatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky