Objectives

To investigate the relationship between self-reported self-harm and dislike of dentofacial features and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL).

Materials and Methods

Anonymous, self-reporting questionnaires were completed by 699 school children (aged 13–14 years), representing over 1% of the age group in Amman, Jordan. Participants were invited from 23 randomly selected schools in 10 educational directorates. OHRQoL was assessed using the Child Perception Questionnaire (CPQ 11–14). Self-harm was assessed using a constructed self-reporting questionnaire. The relationship between OHRQoL and self-harm was assessed and significant findings were identified at probability of α = 0.05.

Results

Over one-quarter of schoolchildren (26.9%, n = 88) admitted self-harming behavior. Self-harm was reported to be due to dislike of dentofacial appearance among 12.9% of participants (n = 90). Higher CPQ 11–14 total scores and individual dimension scores were associated with the presence of self-harm (P < .001). High self-harm incidence was reported among participants who had dentofacial features that affected appearance (P < .001). Among subjects admitting self-harm, the frequency of self-harming behavior ranged from once to over 10 times per year.

Conclusions

Significant relationships were found between self-harm and dislike of dentofacial features and OHRQoL.

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Author notes

a

Professor of Orthodontics, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.

b

Consultant, Kingston Hospital and St George's Hospital and Medical School, London, United Kingdom.

c

Consultant, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

d

Professor, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.