ABSTRACT

Objectives

To investigate the relationship between the use of social networking sites (SNSs) on patient perceptions, acceptance, and expectations of treatment using temporary anchorage devices (TADs) and to compare differences between patients from the United Kingdom and Brazil.

Materials and Methods

Cross-sectional questionnaires were administered to 39 participants at orthodontic practices in the United Kingdom and Brazil about patients' use of SNSs, exposure to TADs on SNSs, and thoughts on extractions, jaw surgery, or TADs as treatment options.

Results

UK patients prefer for clinicians to have SNS profiles (P = .022). Most UK and Brazilian patients want to see their clinician's work online (76.7%) and use SNSs to get information about treatment options (76.6%). There was a statistically significant difference in Brazilian patients' acceptance of TADs as a treatment option compared with UK patients, particularly if it meant avoiding extractions (P = .002), avoiding jaw surgery (P = .004), or reducing treatment time (P = .010). Knowledge of TADs was greater in Brazilian patients (P < .001).

Conclusions

Patients use SNSs to obtain information about treatments and prefer clinicians to have social media accounts. Patients exposed to TADs on SNSs are more likely to accept them as an orthodontic treatment option. UK patients have less knowledge of TADs and are therefore less sure to consider TADs as an option. Brazilian patients are more confident in considering the use of TADs. Clinicians should consider increasing their social media presence to accommodate patients' expectations and acceptance of TADs.

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Author notes

a

Private practice, Orthodontic Department, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals Trust, Cambridge, UK.

b

Professor and Department Chair, Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Medical Sciences of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

c

Department Head, Orthodontic Department, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals Trust, Cambridge, UK.

d

Associate Professor and Department Head, Graduate Program in Dentistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

e

PhD student, Graduate Program in Dentistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

f

Professor, Neuropsychology Department, NRC Faculty of Medical Sciences and Public Health II, Lebanese University; and INSPECT-LB: Institut National de Santé Publique, Epidemiologie Clinique et Toxicologie, Beirut, Lebanon.

g

Professor and Department Head, Graduate Program in Dentistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

h

Professor and Department Head, Department of Craniofacial Development, GKT Dental Institute, Guy's Hospital, London, UK.