Treatment of ankylosed and submerged primary molars without permanent successors is challenging, as normal vertical dentoalveolar growth is compromised. Thus, grafting techniques and distraction osteogenesis are performed for ridge augmentation before implant restoration. However, these techniques are invasive with limited success. Another treatment for implant site development is noninvasive forced eruption. This case report describes long-term follow-up of alveolar ridge augmentation in the submerged mandibular primary second molars using subluxation and orthodontic forced eruption for implant site development. A 19-year old female had Class II molar relationships, upper anterior crowding with large overjet, missing four second premolars and submerged mandibular primary second molars with inadequate vertical development of alveolar bone. For the vertical alveolar bone alterations in the mandible, forced eruption with subluxation of ankylosed lower primary second molars was applied. Treatment outcome was evaluated over 5 years with stable occlusion, healthy periodontal tissues, and successful radiographic results.

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Author notes

The first two authors contributed equally to this work.

a

Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Dental 4D Research Institute, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.

b

Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.

c

Professor, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.

d

Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Dental 4D Research Institute, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.

e

Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Dental 4D Research Institute, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.