• The Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine was first published in 1926 as a specialty journal of the American Medical Association. It became the official journal of the College of American Pathologists in 1995. Under the dynamic leadership of its most recent editor-in-chief, Philip T. Cagle, MD, the Archives has dramatically increased its impact factor and become the most widely read general pathology journal. Dr. Cagle has consistently added leading pathologists to the editorial board, and the collective expertise of these individuals is clearly evident in new, cutting-edge journal masthead sections. The Archives has featured innovative content in the field of digital pathology, including articles on the utilization of smart phones in pathology and the incorporation of whole-slide images and videos into the content of articles. During the current editorial board's tenure, special sections were introduced and have proven immensely popular with the journal's readership. As the Archives celebrates its 94th anniversary, its editorial board remains committed to providing insightful and relevant medical knowledge. The journal's open access Web site (www.archivesofpathology.org) allows the dissemination of this information to every corner of the globe at no expense to those who wish to expand their knowledge or improve their medical practice. Dr. Cagle, with support from the editorial board and journal staff, has worked tirelessly during his tenure as Archives editor-in-chief to greatly enhance the content of the journal and its stature within pathology and laboratory medicine.

The Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine was first published in 1926 as a specialty journal of the American Medical Association (AMA). In 1995, it became the official journal of the College of American Pathologists (CAP). Although it was a joint publication with the AMA for about a decade beginning in 1984, the Archives has been the CAP'S official journal for only a quarter century of the journal's 94-year history.

Subsequent to the untimely death of former Editor-in-Chief Kenneth D. McClatchey, DDS, MD, in 2003, Gregorio Chejfec, MD, assumed the role of acting editor-in-chief of the Archives in January of 2004. A search committee to identify a new Archives editor-in-chief was formed under then CAP President Mary Kass, MD. Late in 2004, Philip T. Cagle, MD, director of pulmonary pathology at Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, and a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, was selected as the new editor-in-chief. He officially became the new editor-in-chief in January of 2005. With the selection of Dr. Cagle, a new Archives era was born. For more than half of the quarter century that the Archives has been the CAP'S official journal, it has been under the dynamic leadership of Dr. Cagle and his vibrant editorial board.

Upon becoming editor-in-chief, Dr. Cagle began working to establish a Web-based manuscript submission and review system that replaced the previous paper-based submission process. Using this system as a daily management tool, Dr. Cagle instituted a unique editorial board hierarchy that includes a general editorial board, section editors for a wide range of subspecialties and special topic areas, and, at an advisory level, associate editors, an executive advisory board, and deputy editors-in-chief. This complex structure includes editors from all types of pathology practice (including academic, community, and commercial laboratory) and across 4 generations of pathologists, as well as physicians from other specialties.

Philip T. Cagle, MD

Philip T. Cagle, MD

Over the years, in addition to the traditional subspecialty areas, Dr. Cagle pioneered new leading-edge masthead sections to keep ahead of evolving practices in pathology, including Informatics, Pathology Education, Quality Assurance, Global Health, Precision Medicine, Environmental Pathology, Transplantation Pathology, Advanced Imaging in Pathology, Clinical Effectiveness and Economics, Digital Pathology, Emerging Technologies and Techniques, Immune Therapy, Molecular Cytopathology, Virology, Social Media, and Artificial Intelligence. He recruited expert editors for all of these sections. To provide special opportunities for residents and fellows-in-training, a Residents Affairs masthead section was created to mentor trainees in the authorship and publication processes. Over the years, other fields of interest have been specifically represented on the masthead.

As the editorial board grew in scope and depth, the Archives tightened its criteria for accepting manuscripts for publication. Archives readers have enthusiastically praised its improved content, and its impact factor has nearly tripled during Dr. Cagle's tenure to date. In addition, the Archives has become recognized as the most widely read of all general pathology journals in the United States. The 2011 Kantar Media readership survey of pathologist publications found that Archives readership had risen to 73% among pathologists, making it the most highly read journal among US practicing pathologists by a wide margin. A subsequent Kantar Media survey in 2015 again found that the Archives is the most widely read of all general pathology journals in the United States, with readership among pathologists at 70%. It should be noted that the Kantar Media surveys measure responses drawn from the AMA master file list of pathologists and therefore are not biased toward CAP membership. In 2009, the Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences of the Special Libraries Association voted Archives the most influential pathology journal of the past 100 years.

Dr. Cagle has introduced many innovations to the Archives. Pioneering in the digital field has been particularly noteworthy, including articles on the utilization of smart phones in pathology by Archives Deputy Editor-in-Chief Jerad Gardner, MD, and other authors (eg, http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2014-0315-RA,1,http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2013-0425-ED,2,http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2014-0593-OA3), and incorporation of whole-slide images and videos into the content of articles (http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2014-0044-ED,4 ,http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2014-0042-ED5). In 2014, the Archives became the first major pathology journal to incorporate whole-slide images and QR codes as integrated components of an article6 (http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2013-0179-OA) with Lynette Sholl, MD, as senior author. The Archives' digital pinnacle to date was the November 2015 special section on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, organized by Michael B. Prystowsky, MD, PhD, which featured an article7 from Richard Smith, MD, and colleagues that included multiple whole-slide images and supplemental videos (http://www.archivesofpathology.org/doi/pdf/10.5858/arpa.2014-0573-RA).

During the current editorial board's tenure, special sections have been featured and have been immensely popular with Archives readership, often serving as mini-courses or condensed books on specific topics. Since Dr. Cagle and the current editorial board assumed leadership, the Archives has published approximately 100 special sections and there are several more still in process. These special sections have included invited themes on many specific anatomic, clinical, and molecular pathology topics, the proceedings of multiple institutional and specialty organization courses, and invited collections from the pathology departments of prestigious medical schools. In addition to tutorials on pathology diagnosis and practice, the special sections have provided forums for diverse themes, including Frozen Sections in Contemporary Practice, Future of Pathology Training and Training Programs, First World Congress on Pathology Informatics, Contributions of Anatomic Pathology to Women's and Perinatal Health, CSE (Council of Science Editors) Global Theme on Poverty and Human Development, and Pathology Services in Resource-Poor Nations.

The many impactful manuscripts produced by various CAP committees and councils are published in Archives, including CAP Laboratory Improvement Program articles. A complex enterprise in recent years has been the joint publication of evidence-based guidelines from the CAP Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center in collaboration with journals of other participating medical organizations. Examples of such published guidelines include Recommendations for Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Testing in Breast Cancer8 and Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGER and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.9 Often, the Archives takes the lead in this intricate joint publication process.

Dr. Cagle and the Archives Editorial Board have done more than manage the most widely read general pathology journal. Each year, members of the editorial board review and score the abstract and case study submissions for the CAP Annual Meeting, with Dr. Cagle as editor-in-chief making final adjudication based on reviewer scores. The success of this program is reflected in the approximately 400% increase in the number of submissions received since the Archives took over management of the CAP Annual Meeting Abstract Program in 2006, making a significant impact on attendance at the meeting and furthering the exchange of medical knowledge. In addition, a select group of Archives editors selects the winners of the Top 5 Junior Member Abstract Program, who receive cash prizes and recognition at the CAP Annual Meeting.

The Archives continues to be an open access journal (www.archivesofpathology.org) available to everyone via the internet, allowing it to reach every corner of the globe at no expense to those who wish to expand their knowledge or improve their medical practice. Given this free global access, the quality of the educational content, and the innovation and forward-thinking vision of Dr. Cagle and his editorial board, it is no wonder that the Archives is the most widely read pathology journal on the globe today.

Perhaps Dr. Cagle's phenomenal success with the Archives comes from his diverse and widespread life experiences. Dr. Cagle was most recently adjunct professor, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Department of Pathology. He has served as professor of pathology, Weill Medical School of Cornell University, New York, New York, and S. Donald Greenberg Chair and Director, Pulmonary Pathology, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas. He brought a diverse background of experience for editor-in-chief of the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine: Dr. Cagle has served as executive advisor of the Pulmonary Pathology Society; co-chair, expert panel, College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology Biomarkers Guidelines Committee; chair, Cancer Biomarker Reporting Committee, College of American Pathologists; 8 years as associate director of the Residency Program, Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine; 2 years as assistant medical examiner, Harris County Medical Examiner's Office, Houston, Texas; and 14 years as a recognized national expert witness in occupational toxic tort litigation. Dr. Cagle has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and 100 book chapters. He has been the editor of 19 textbooks, and series editor of 3 book series. Dr. Cagle has been the recipient of more than 100 medical awards including CAP Pathologist of the Year. He served as education council chair for 14 annual meetings of the Texas Society of Pathologists and has served on countless committees and held leadership positions for dozens of national and international organizations. Nevertheless, throughout his career, Dr. Cagle continued regular hospital service work as a general anatomic pathologist. He was “in the trenches” every day with his colleagues and his residents.

Dr. Cagle's tenure with the Archives has greatly benefited pathologists, our trainees, and ultimately, our patients. Please join me in thanking him for his service to the Archives, the CAP and the profession of pathology.

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Author notes

From the Department of Pathology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson.

The author has no relevant financial interest in the products or companies described in this article.