Context.—

The Nottingham Grading System (NGS) developed by Elston and Ellis is used to grade invasive breast cancer (IBC). Glandular (acinar)/tubule formation is a component of NGS.

Objective.—

To investigate the ability of pathologists to identify individual structures that should be classified as glandular (acinar)/tubule formation.

Design.—

A total of 58 hematoxylin-eosin photographic images of IBC with 1 structure circled were classified as tubules (41 cases) or nontubules (17 cases) by Professor Ellis. Images were sent as a PowerPoint (Microsoft) file to breast pathologists, who were provided with the World Health Organization definition of a tubule and asked to determine if a circled structure represented a tubule.

Results.—

Among 35 pathologists, the κ statistic for assessing agreement in evaluating the 58 images was 0.324 (95% CI, 0.314–0.335). The median concordance rate between a participating pathologist and Professor Ellis was 94.1% for evaluating 17 nontubule cases and 53.7% for 41 tubule cases. A total of 41% of the tubule cases were classified correctly by less than 50% of pathologists. Structures classified as tubules by Professor Ellis but often not recognized as tubules by pathologists included glands with complex architecture, mucinous carcinoma, and the “inverted tubule” pattern of micropapillary carcinoma. A total of 80% of participants reported that they did not have clarity on what represented a tubule.

Conclusions.—

We identified structures that should be included as tubules but that were not readily identified by pathologists. Greater concordance for identification of tubules might be obtained by providing more detailed images and descriptions of the types of structures included as tubules.

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Author notes

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The authors have no relevant financial interest in the products or companies described in this article.

Presented as an abstract at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology Annual Meeting; March 14, 2023; New Orleans, Louisiana.

Supplementary data