As defined by the International League Against Epilepsy, epilepsy is a “disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures and by the neurobiologic, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences of this condition” (Fisher et al., 2014, p. 476). An estimated 50–65 million people worldwide have epilepsy, making it one of the most common neurological diseases globally (World Health Organization [WHO], 2022). The estimated proportion of the general population with active epilepsy (i.e., continuing seizures or continuing need for treatment to suppress seizures) at any given time is between 4 and 10 per 1,000 people (WHO, 2022).

The primary clinical treatment goals for persons with epilepsy (PWE) are (a) seizure freedom and (b) freedom from the effects of epilepsy-related comorbidities. Seeking seizure freedom is critical because, over time, uncontrolled seizures are associated with higher rates of depression and anxiety and increased mortality (Fisher et...

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