WILLIAM E. “BILL” DUELLMAN (Fig. 1) was a central figure in herpetology during the second half of the 20th century and the first 22 years of the 21st century. His influence in herpetology doubtlessly will extend for centuries. I submit that Bill's most significant contributions to herpetology were, unordered, his students, his fieldwork and specimens, and his publications—especially his hundreds of taxonomic efforts and his highly influential regional treatments (e.g., Santa Cecilia; Duellman, 1978), monographs (e.g., Duellman, 1970, 2001), and the magnificent textbook on amphibians (Duellman and Trueb, 1986).

In the early part of the 20th century, the pillars of herpetological research in North America were mostly in the elite institutions in the eastern and western U.S. (particularly Harvard and Stanford). The maverick pillar in the Midwest was the University of Michigan and its Museum of Zoology, as well an...

You do not currently have access to this content.