Abstract

The frequency, intensity, and content of specific fears in 299 children with and without mental retardation (ages 6 to 13 years) were investigated. The children with mental retardation reported a greater fear intensity than did younger children without mental retardation but did not differ in the number of fears reported. However, children with mental retardation reported both a greater frequency and intensity of fears than did similar-age peers without mental retardation. Gender differences in frequency and intensity of fears were assessed, and the most common fears (with and without regard to intensity ratings) of the groups were compared and implications for future research and practice presented.

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