In the following paper we explore the dilemma of treatment with phenylalanine-restricted diet in persons with phenylketonuria (PKU). There is still controversy, as can be found in most pediatric and internal medicine textbooks, as to when and if to stop the diet initiated at neonatal diagnosis. Some centers continue the diet until age 6 to 10 years, whereas others recommend treatment for life. In Israel the policy had been to discontinue diet at about 10 years.

Phenylketonuria was discovered in 1934, when a Norwegian mother brought her son and daughter, both of whom had mental retardation, to Professor Asbjorn Folling at the University of Oslo School of Medicine for a consultation (Guttler, 1984). In 1947, Jervis showed that the administration of phenylalanine to normal human patients without PKU led to a prompt rise in blood tyrosine, whereas no increase in blood tyrosine...

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