Some years ago I moved from the world of public policy and administration in developmental disabilities at the Human Services Research Institute to the world below—the world of front-line agencies actually serving people with developmental disabilities and others in need of publicly funded services and supports. I have come to appreciate, more than ever, the critical and difficult role these providers play in the resource-starved human services industry. It is this heightened appreciation, in contrast to the marked decline in appreciation among outspoken devotees of the self-determination movement, that has given rise to this writing.

Lunching with a respected colleague last month, I was taken back at her vision of developmental disabilities systems of the future—one that I have been hearing more and more often in the preachings of self-determination advocates. Support coordinators will help consumers, families, and others concerned choose among different self-employed...

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