During the past quarter century, the organization of service delivery has changed notably along two dimensions: a shift from (a) institutional to community services and (b) states being the primary providers of services to states being primarily buyers of services from non-state (usually private) organizations. The shift from institutional to community living has substantially affected the role of the direct support professionals (DSPs), who within the community work with far less direct supervision, less on-site professional support, and substantially greater individual responsibility than do DSPs in institutional settings. With the shift from state to non-state employees as the primary service providers, pay and other compensation for DSPs has also been affected. National studies have documented lower compensation (wages and benefits) for DSPs in non-state agencies when compared with those employed by the state (Braddock & Mitchell, 1992; Lakin & Bruininks, 1981)....

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