As service professionals strive to become more focused on the needs and aspirations of people with disabilities, soliciting information directly from individuals about their perceptions of their lives has become increasingly important (Freedman, 2001; Rapley, 2003; Schalock, 1994; Sigelman, Budd, Spanhel, & Schoenrock, 1981; Sigelman et al., 1980). People with disabilities are taking a larger and more primary role in the planning, evaluation, and delivery of services. Consequently, the nature of research efforts has been evolving from one in which investigators treat people with disabilities as subjects to one that includes these “subjects” in the design and implementation of the research. Conducting such studies requires careful planning on the part of researchers. In this paper we reflect on the challenges of surveying people with disabilities and discuss possible strategies to address these challenges.

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