The sibling relationship constitutes the longest lasting family tie, beginning with the birth of the younger sibling and ending with the death of one member of the sibling pair. Siblings share a common family heritage, both genetically and experientially, and perhaps for this reason, the sibling relationship is normatively characterized as egalitarian, reciprocal, and mutual. How is the sibling relationship distinct when one member of the sibling pair has a developmental disability? Aspects of the sibling tie might be atypical in this context, in several respects. For example, the duration of the relationship might be shorter, as some individuals with developmental disabilities have a more limited life-span. In addition, there may be less genetic and experiential similarity between members of the sib pair and less egalitarianism and reciprocal exchange due to unequal abilities and patterns of life course outcomes. However, there may also be...

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