The 1994/1995 National Health Interview Survey on Disability (NHIS-D) offered a rare opportunity to estimate the number of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) in the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population (see Larson et al., 2001). Analyses of that data set were combined with the annual state-by-state data collection from the Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) to estimate a combined prevalence of intellectual or developmental disabilities of 14.9 per 1,000 (1.49%) in 1995. Of the estimated 4.25 million persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the United States, 334,430 persons (7.8% of the total) lived by themselves or with an unrelated person such as a roommate or partner (Larson, Doljanac, & Lakin, 2005). An additional 261,260 (6.1%) reported being married and living with a spouse. An estimated 3,291,167 persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities lived with parents, siblings, or other relatives (77.5%). The remaining...

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