The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2 age groups: middle age (Ages 40–59 years) and older ages (≥60 years). Prevalence of arthritis, high blood pressure, obesity, and activity limitations for the caregivers in both age groups was significantly higher than that for women in the general population. Middle-age caregivers reported a higher prevalence of diabetes and high blood cholesterol than their age peers from the general population. Despite the potential health challenges, the caregivers generally perceived their health better than that of women in the general population. Older caregivers' perceptions on their psychological well being, however, appeared to an exception. Implications regarding potential health risks for caregivers and residential services for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities are discussed.

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