As a graduate student in rehabilitation counseling, I have recently enrolled in a graduate-level course entitled “Tests and Measurements.” Though it is a mandatory class, it is one I would have enrolled in even if it was not required because it offers an explanation of the ways and means of the mysterious and cryptic tests used to determine individuals' profiles by examining various skills. It was during class project descriptions and a discussion of the format of an evaluation summary that I recognized a disturbing fact—a diagnosis, a history of disability, and/or reported atypical behaviors that have prompted the need for evaluation are presented at the beginning of an assessment. When I asked whether this was the norm, I was advised that indeed it was. From that moment I realized that as a counselor-in-training, I was acting in a way that was...

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