The concern that most people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are “invisible” in health surveillance has been the focus of attention for at least two decades since the publication of the Surgeon General's Closing the Gap report (Office of the Surgeon General, 2002). Surveillance refers to systematic and repeated collection, analysis, and interpretation of health related data to inform planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practices. This concern of “invisibility” has been exacerbated by recent changes in two U.S. surveillance systems, the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) that no longer contain questions to allow monitoring of the health of this population. “From invisible to visible to valued”—this special issue is intended to increase knowledge of researchers, policy makers, program planners, and advocates on health surveillance of people with IDD, bringing forward directions to improve the...

You do not currently have access to this content.