Abstract

Health systems often fail to tap the expertise of the developmental disabilities community support and service system. In this 9-month pilot health system-level quality improvement project, a multi-disciplinary team of physician, pharmacist, and disabilities advocate reviewed electronic records of patients with Down syndrome in advance of pre-scheduled appointments with their primary care physician (PCP) and generated 100 electronic consultations. Post-consultation chart review documented meaningful uptake of clinical recommendations, including screening for thyroid disease, celiac disease, and heart disease, pneumococcal vaccination, and screening physical examination for myelopathy. In addition to clinical recommendations regarding screening, diagnosis, and treatment, each consultation provided an average of eight tailored suggestions for potential community-based resources related to mental and behavioral health, recreation, socialization, and other relevant services and supports. “Push” multi-disciplinary electronic consultations in advance of primary care appointments enriched with input from disabilities community experts have the potential to improve the quality of health care provided to persons with developmental disabilities.

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