Since the passage of the Education of All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, educational services for students with extensive support needs (e.g., intellectual disability, autism, multiple disabilities) have been constantly evolving, with at least three overlapping waves of inquiry and practice. In this article we describe extant research, debate, and commentary related to involvement and progress in the general curriculum for students with extensive support needs, and we discuss implications for future research, policy, and practice related to inclusive education. The article begins with an exploration of some key concepts related to the general curriculum, capturing some of the field's diverse thinking about what constitutes free appropriate public education. Then we examine selected research findings, debates, and commentaries, organized around four key components of education: instructional context, curriculum content, assessment and accountability, and long-term student outcomes. Finally, we offer some overall observations about the state of extant research and implications for future research, policy, and practice related to involvement and progress in the general curriculum for students with extensive support needs in inclusive general-education contexts.

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