This special issue of Inclusion focuses on health, health promotion, and health care for people with intellectual disability (ID). The relationship between inclusion and health is bidirectional in that greater inclusion in one's community is related to improved health, and improved health facilitates increased participation and inclusion in the community. As Anderson et al. (2013) noted, gaps in the literature in regard to improving health for this population include a lack of trials of interventions for this population and a lack of data that allow for better comparisons between people with ID and those without. However, enhancing knowledge in each of these areas would help enable the identification and implementation of effective supports for health.

For many years, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has funded State Disability and Health Programs to address health issues for people with disabilities. In 2016, CDC specifically targeted improving...

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