This study examined the relationships between social and demographic characteristics (ie, gender, race, year in school, desired residency choice, and socioeconomic background), motivations for entering the profession of podiatric medicine (extrinsic and intrinsic rewards), and negative attitudes toward treating elderly patients. The study used ordinary least squares multiple regression models to analyze data from a random, national sample of 448 podiatric medical students. In particular, the ordinary least squares models were developed to determine the independent effect of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards on negative attitudes toward treating elderly patients. Consistent with the study hypotheses, after adjusting for social and demographic characteristics, the study found extrinsic rewards to have strong positive relationships with negative attitudes toward treating elderly patients, and intrinsic rewards to have strong negative relationships with negative attitudes toward treating elderly patients. The authors discussed the implications of the findings for podiatric physicians and educators training podiatric medical students.

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