ABSTRACT

Context: Training load and movement quality are associated with injury risk in athletes. Given these associations, it is important to understand how movement quality may moderate training load so that appropriate prevention strategies be employed.

Objectives: To determine how absolute and relative internal training load change over the course of a men's NCAA soccer season, and determine how movement quality, assessed using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), moderates relative internal training load.

Design: Prospective Cohort Study

Setting: NCAA Division I athletics

Patients or Other Participants: One NCAA Division I male collegiate soccer team was recruited and followed over two consecutive seasons. Fifty-two athletes (height = 1.81 ± .06 m, mass = 75.74 ± 6.64 kg, age = 19.71 ± 1.30 years) consented to participate and forty six met the criteria to be included in the final statistical analysis.

Main Outcome Measures: Daily absolute internal training load was tracked over the course of two seasons using a rated perceived exertion scale and time which were subsequently used to calculate absolute and relative internal training loads. Movement quality was assessed using the LESS and categorized participants as poor movers (LESS >5) and good movers (LESS <4).

Results: The 46 athletes included in the final analysis included 29 poor movers and 17good movers. Absolute (p < 0.001) and relative (p<0.001) internal training load differed across weeks of the season. However, movement quality did not moderate relative (p=0.264) internal training load.

Conclusions: Absolute and relative training load changed across weeks of a male collegiate soccer season. Movement quality did not impact relative training load but further research with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm this result.

Key Points:
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    Absolute and relative internal training load change throughout a Division I collegiate male soccer season.

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    In male collegiate soccer players, movement quality did not moderate relative internal training load.

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Author notes

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