Abstract

Context: Low mental health scores, depression, and anxiety are associated with worse pain and functional outcomes following hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS). Pre-operative screening of psychosocial factors such as pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy, and kinesiophobia may further aid in identifying patients at-risk for poorer outcomes.

Objective: Compare pre-operative function and psychosocial factors between patients with and without elevated post-operative pain three-months following hip arthroscopy for FAIS.

Design: Prospective cohort

Setting: University health center

Participants: 51 individuals with FAIS (41F/10M; age:37.6±12.3years; BMI:27.1±4.1kg/m2)

Outcome measures: Pre-operatively participants completed the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), 12-Item International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), and a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for hip pain at rest and during activity. Three-months post-operatively, participants completed the PSEQ, TSK, PCS, iHOT-12 and VAS. Pre-operative scores were compared between those with (VAS≥3) and without (VAS<3) elevated post-operative pain using Mann-Whitney U tests, and odds ratios were calculated to determine the odds of having elevated post-operative pain and lower post-operative function.

Results: Participants with elevated post-operative pain at rest and during activity had worse pre-operative psychosocial health (p≤0.04). Those with elevated pain at rest had worse pre-operative function (p≤0.001). The odds of having elevated post-operative pain at rest were 45 times and 4.5 times higher for those with low self-efficacy and high pain catastrophizing (p≤.03).

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