Abstract

Peripheral intravenous therapy (PIV) is probably the most common acute care invasive procedure, estimated at 90 percent for all inpatients. Current standards of practice recommend the use of a manufactured catheter stabilization device to secure PIVs. At FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital (MRH), the PIV policy requires the use of a stabilization device to achieve a 96 hour dwell time for the PIV. The hospital does not utilize an intravenous therapy team; all nurses can insert PIVs and apply the dressing. In 2009, as a cost reduction measure, MRH changed securement devices from a two piece dressing and securement device to the Sorbaview SHIELD (SHIELD). A clinical evaluation of the SHIELD was conducted in January 2010, with 109 medical-surgical patients with PIVs, to demonstrate the expected cost savings associated with the SHIELD by maintaining the PIV for 96 hours and meeting patient and staff expectations. In 91.5% of the patients, the PIV stayed in for their length of stay (if less than 96 hours) or for 96 hours, only eight patients had unscheduled restarts. Eighty-six percent of nurses surveyed rated the device as excellent to good. Ninety-one percent of patients reported no discomfort of their PIV site. Changing to this device in 2009 has resulted in an average annual cost savings of $120,000 over the two piece device and has improved compliance by nursing.

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