Flucloxacillin is a narrow spectrum beta-lactam antibiotic of the penicillin class. Flucloxacillin exerts antibacterial activity by binding to and inactivating penicillin-binding proteins present on the inner membrane of the bacterial cell wall.1 Inactivation of penicillin-binding proteins interferes with cross-linkage of peptidoglycan chains to cause interruption of the bacterial cell wall resulting in cell lysis.1 Flucloxacillin is used to treat a range of infections caused by gram-positive bacteria, including skin and soft tissue infections, osteomyelitis, and endocarditis.1 The prescribed dose of intravenous flucloxacillin can range from 250 mg to 2 g delivered every 4–6 hours.

To deliver medications intravenously, peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are commonly used in the acute setting. The complications of using PIVCs to deliver intravenous medications include phlebitis, local infection, bloodstream infection, infiltration occlusion, extravasation, and inadvertent removal....

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