Highlights

  • Elderly patients had lower body weight and body mass index and had a higher rate of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  • No significant differences were found with respect to primary, assisted primary, and secondary patency rates according to age.

  • This study suggests that excellent patency rates were achieved in octogenarians compared with younger patients.

Abstract

Objective: The number of elderly patients requiring hemodialysis has consistently increased, but outcomes of hemodialysis vascular access in octogenarians are poorly described. The aims of this study were to evaluate the outcome of vascular access in octogenarians.

Methods: We analyzed 262 vascular access treatments performed at a single center. Cases were divided into 2 groups based on age: ≥80 years old (group A, n = 62) and <80 years old (group B, n = 200). The differences in baseline characteristics, procedural variables, and patency rates between the 2 groups were subsequently analyzed. Results: Mean age was 85.3 ± 4.6 years and 66.5 ± 10.3 years in groups A and B, respectively (P < 0.001). Height did not differ significantly between groups; however, weight and body mass index (BMI) were significantly different (51.0 ± 9.7 kg versus 56.1 ± 16.9 kg, P = 0.040; 25.2 ± 4.0 kg/m2 versus 27.5 ± 6.5 kg/m2, P = 0.018). Nephrosclerosis as the cause of renal failure requiring hemodialysis was significantly more common in group A (29.0% vs 16.0%; P = 0.023). The older patient group had a significantly higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; 11.3% vs 0.5%, P < 0.001). No significant intergroup differences were found with respect to primary, assisted primary, and secondary patency rates.

Conclusions: Elderly patients had lower weight and BMI and were more commonly diagnosed with COPD. Our results demonstrated that the primary, assisted primary, and secondary patency rates of octogenarians did not differ from those of younger patients.

You do not currently have access to this content.