Vascular access today is the most common invasive procedure performed in healthcare.1 More than 300 million peripheral intravenous catheters and upward of 8 million central venous access devices (CVADs) are placed in patients in the acute care setting annually.1 Over the past 2 plus decades, vascular access has grown into a recognized clinical specialty, requiring specialized knowledge, training, skill development, and experience. The combination of this experience and knowledge establishes a high quality of vascular access holistic care, providing greater opportunities for improved device and patient outcomes and minimizing the risk of complications and impact on the patient experience.2–4 

The modern, ever-changing healthcare landscape requires a dedication to constant quality and service improvements in the provision of vascular access. These high-volume, often high-risk and problem-prone processes are now directly linked to quality of care, length of...

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