Aim: This study aimed to identify the types of complications of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) in hospitalised children and possible risk factors for the development of extravasation, infiltration and phlebitis. Method: The study was conducted in the largest children’s hospital in a region of Turkey, with a bed capacity of 354 and 1400 employees, which provides care only to paediatric patients aged from newborn to 18 years old. In this 5-month prospective study, the complications of PIVCs in hospitalised children and risk factors leading to the development of extravasation, infiltration and phlebitis were recorded. During morning and afternoon daily visits, the researcher examined catheter sites for complications and indications for removal. Results: The study covered 244 patients aged from 1 month to 17 years, 575 PIVCs and 1600 catheter days. The rates of infiltration and phlebitis observed in children with PIVCs were 8.7 % and 15.8% respectively. Logistic regression revealed that using 22- and 24-gauge catheters, hospitalisation in the surgery ward and continuous infusion were significant independent risk factors for the development of infiltration (P<0.001). Direct logistic regression revealed that age in months, hospitalisation in a surgery ward and placement of the catheter in the veins of the antecubital fossa were significant independent risk factors for the development of phlebitis (P<0.001). Conclusion: Catheter size, hospitalisation in the surgery ward and continuous infusion contributed to the development of infiltration. Age, hospitalisation in the surgery ward and catheter placement in the antecubital vein contributed to the development of phlebitis.

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