Objective

This study examined the effectiveness of teaching biochemical concepts by video in a doctor of chiropractic training program.

Methods

Students in a biochemistry class were taught the Krebs cycle through a video exercise and glycolysis in a traditional lecture format. They received a review of both concepts and were tested. Test performance was examined. Students answered a questionnaire following the exercise.

Results

There were no significant differences in test performance on the topic learned by the video exercise. However, students felt that both lecture and review were more effective learning tools than video.

Conclusion

Despite the results of other authors, our students preferred traditional didactic lecture with review rather than video. With no difference in test scores observed, the role of videos in our basic science course remains unclear, perhaps only used as an occasional supplement. These results were not expected, given the often-preferred use of technology by current learners.

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Author notes

Kathryn Shaw is an associate professor in the Department of Life Sciences at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida (4777 City Center Parkway, Port Orange, FL 32129; kathy.shaw@palmer.edu). Ali Rabatsky is an associate professor in the Department of Life Sciences at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida (4777 City Center Parkway, Port Orange, FL 32129; ali.rabatsky@palmer.edu).

Concept development: KS. Design: KS, AR. Supervision: KS, AR. Data collection/processing: KS, AR. Analysis/interpretation: AR. Literature search: KS, AR. Writing: KS, AR. Critical review: KS, AR.