Objective

To assess the self-perceived importance, skills, and utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP) among faculty and students at a chiropractic institution without a structured EBP program. The survey also evaluated EBP satisfaction among students and EBP implementation barriers/facilitators among the faculty.

Methods

In this cross-sectional study, a set of organized questionnaires to assess the importance of EBP and self-perceived skills, utilization, barriers, and facilitators for faculty members, and student satisfaction was administered to the students and faculty of a chiropractic institution in February–March 2016. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate responses.

Results

A total of 417 (60.1%) students and 27 (60.0%) faculty members completed the survey. Faculty members' and students' EBP importance values were similar (8.4 and 8.3 out of 10, respectively), but faculty members self-reported their EBP skills (7.3/10) at a higher level than the student self-reported skill level (6.1/10). For utilization, students reported a higher utilization of EBP than that reported by the responding faculty members. Perceived student satisfaction on the quality and content of research-related experiences decreased from the first year to the third (final) year.

Conclusion

This study found variance in the self-perceived EBP skills, utilization, barriers, and facilitators and that these skills are lagging at our doctor of chiropractic program, which does not have a structured EBP program. Faculty members and students identified the importance for EBP. Similar observations have been found at other chiropractic institutions prior to their implementation of a systematic EBP program. Those developing an EBP curriculum might use these findings to better design, implement, and assess a structured program.

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Author notes

Anjum Odhwani is a professor in the Department of Basic Sciences at Parker University (2540 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX 75229; aodhwani@parker.edu). Pradip Sarkar is a professor in the Department of Basic Sciences at Parker University (2540 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX 75229; psarkar@parker.edu). Gene Giggleman is a professor in the Department of Basic Sciences at Parker University (2540 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX 75229; ggiggleman@parker.edu). Michelle Holmes is a lecturer in research methods at AECC University College (Parkwood Campus, Parkwood Road, Bournemouth BH5 2DF, United Kingdom; mholmes@aecc.ac.uk). Kathrine Pohlman is the director of research at Parker University Research Institute (2540 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX 75229; KPohlman@parker.edu).

Concept development: KP, AO. Design: KP, AO. Supervision: KP. Data collection/processing: KP, AO, PS, GG. Analysis/interpretation: KP, MH, AO, PS. Literature search: KP, AO, PS, GG. Writing: KP, AO, PS, GG, MH. Critical review: KP, AO, PS, GG. MH.