Objective

Chiropractic, as a business in the health care system, has a component of entrepreneurship. Therefore, it is important to have business education in chiropractic schools. This study examines perceptions of business education in chiropractic schools as evaluated by Ontario, Canada, practicing chiropractors.

Methods

We conducted a series of interviews with 16 chiropractors practicing in Ontario. Questions aimed at analyzing 2 levels of chiropractors' perceptions on the quality of business education they received. The questions were designed around 2 concepts: perceived level of business knowledge acquired and current level of knowledge for 6 business topics. The topics included accounting and finance, organizational behavior and human resources, legal and ethical issues, strategic management, managerial decision making, and operational management. Interview responses were analyzed by grouping significant statements into themes followed by descriptions of what and how the subjects experienced the phenomena.

Results

The interviews revealed that Ontario practicing chiropractors' requirements for education in business skills are both broad and essential, embracing most if not all major business domains. Many participants indicated that the status of business education in chiropractic schools is minimally contributing to business skills following graduation.

Conclusion

Producing chiropractors with entrepreneurship skills requires enhanced business education in chiropractic schools. Perceptions of Ontario chiropractors reveal a gap between skill-oriented business training in chiropractic education and the skills needed to practice within the profession.

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Author notes

Michael Ciolfi is the interim dean of the College of Health Sciences and director of the School of Chiropractic at the University of Bridgeport, College of Health Sciences, School of Chiropractic (30 Hazel Street, Bridgeport, CT 06604; mciolfi@bridgeport.edu). Ayla Azad is an instructor in the Department of Chiropractic Therapeutics at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario, M2H 3J1, Canada; aazad@cmcc.ca). Mohammed Al-Azdee is an associate professor of mass communication at the University of Bridgeport, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Public and International Affairs (30 Hazel Street, Bridgeport, CT 06604; malazdee@bridgeport.edu). Andrew Habib is in private chiropractic practice (38 Sayor Drive, Ajax, Ontario, L1T 3K6, Canada; Dr.habib@sportscentres.ca). Amanda Lalla is in private chiropractic practice (96 Winterfold Drive, Brampton, Ontario, L6V 3T3, Canada; Amanda.lalla@gmail.com). Madine Moslehi is in private chiropractic practice (87 Pine Bough Manor, Richmondhill, Ontario, L4S 1A5, Canada; Madihe.moslehi@gmail.com). Alex Nguyen is in private chiropractic practice (1415 Duval Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5V 2W5, Canada; Alexnguyen.dc@gmail.com). Bita Ahmadpanah is in private chiropractic practice (9275 Bayview Avenue, Unit 2, Richmond Hill Ontario, L4C 9X4, Canada; drbitaa@gmail.com).

Concept development: MAC, AA. Design: MAC, AA. Supervision: MAC. Data collection/processing: AH, MM, AN, AL, BA. Analysis/interpretation: MHA. Literature search: MAC, AA, AH, MM, AN, AL, BA. Writing: MAC. Critical review: MAC, AA, AH, MM, AN, AL, BA.