Objective

Case-based online modules can be created to integrate basic science and clinical science knowledge. An integrated module was designed, implemented, and evaluated for student performance and perception.

Methods

Five faculty members from both basic science and clinical education departments developed an integrative, online, case-based learning module. The case involved a patient with facial asymmetry, and the student was led to a diagnosis of Bell's palsy. Material on Bell's palsy was presented in an integrated module in addition to traditional lecture for a fall cohort of students and was presented only in traditional lecture format to a winter cohort of students. Both cohorts were given the same 5 multiple-choice questions on Bell's palsy as part of a midterm exam, and the scores of these test questions were compared between cohorts. A 13-question, mixed-methods survey was given to the fall cohort to determine their perceptions of the module and their learning.

Results

Multiple-choice test question performance was equivalent between cohorts for the Bell's palsy questions (fall 2018: mean = 3.68, SD = 0.99; winter 2019: mean = 3.51, SD = 0.92). Perception survey responses indicated that students felt positively about the integrated module and that it was applicable and helpful with improving, reinforcing, and integrating basic science and clinical knowledge.

Conclusion

This study provides evidence that case-based integrated modules are perceived favorably by students and result in similar exam question performance. They can be a useful tool to help students connect information throughout the chiropractic curriculum.

This content is only available as a PDF.

Author notes

Christine Major is an assistant professor in the Department of Basic Sciences in the College of Chiropractic at the University of Western States (2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; chmajor@uws.edu). Kara Burnham is an associate professor in the Department of Basic Sciences in the College of Chiropractic at the University of Western States (2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; kburnham@uws.edu). Kathryn Brown is an assistant professor of clinical education in the College of Chiropractic at the University of Western States (2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; kbrown@uws.edu). Chad Lambert is an assistant professor of clinical education in the College of Chiropractic at the University of Western States (2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; chlambert@uws.edu). Jenny Nordeen is an assistant professor of clinical education in the College of Chiropractic at the University of Western States (2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; jnordeen@uws.edu). Leslie Takaki is the director of scholarly activity in the Department of Research at the University of Western States (2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; ltakaki@uws.edu). Address correspondence to Christine Major, University of Western States, 2900 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230; chmajor@uws.edu). This article was received January 16, 2020; revised May 28, 2020; and accepted July 27, 2020.

Concept development: KDB, JMN, CAM. Design: KDB, JMN, CAM, KAB, CDL, LAKT. Supervision: KDB, JMN, CAM, KAB, CDL. Data collection/processing: KAB, JMN, LAKT. Analysis/interpretation: KDB, JMN, CAM, KAB, CDL, LAKT. Literature search: CAM, KDB. Writing: KDB, JMN, CAM, KAB, CDL, LAKT. Critical review: KDB, JMN, CAM, KAB, CDL, LAKT.