Objective

To assess the ability of 2nd-year students to identify normal and abnormal findings during cardiac and lung auscultation using high-fidelity manikin simulators and standardized patients. A secondary objective was to assess students' perceived competence and confidence in their abilities.

Methods

This was a descriptive pilot study of randomly selected 2nd-year students at 1 chiropractic training program. Participants were asked to perform cardiac and lung auscultation on high-fidelity manikins (2 stations) and standardized human patients (2 stations) with normal and abnormal auscultation sounds. Participants described the auscultated sound as “abnormal” or “normal” and were also asked to score their confidence in describing the sound and competence in performing auscultation on a 100-mm visual analog scale. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all study variables.

Results

Thirty-two students (23 women and 9 men) were included. For lung auscultation, 15.6% were incorrect on the human subject and 6.2% were incorrect on the manikin. For cardiac auscultation, 62.5% were incorrect on the human subject and 40.6% were incorrect on the manikin. Confidence mean scores ranged from 34.8 to 60. Competence mean scores ranged from 34.8 to 50.

Conclusion

Results identified that 2nd-year students from 1 institution were correct in identifying an abnormal sound during lung auscultation but reported low levels of perceived competence or confidence in their responses. They performed poorly on cardiac auscultation and reported low perceived confidence and competence in their abilities to perform cardiac auscultation and identify sounds.

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Author notes

Sophia A. da Silva-Oolup (corresponding author) is an assistant professor of undergraduate education at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON M2H 3J1, Canada; sdasilvaoolup@cmcc.ca). Dominic Giuliano is a director of undergraduate education at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON M2H 3J1, Canada; dgiuliano@cmcc.ca). Brynne Stainsby is an assistant professor of undergraduate education at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON M2H 3J1, Canada; bstainsby@cmcc.ca). Joshua Thomas is a student at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON M2H 3J1, Canada; jthomas@cmcc.ca). David Starmer is a director of undergraduate education at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (6100 Leslie Street, Toronto, ON M2H 3J1, Canada; dstarmer@cmcc.ca).

Concept development: SDO, DS. Design: SDO, DS, DG. Supervision: SDO, DS, JT. Data collection/processing: SDO, DS, DG, JT. Analysis/interpretation: SDO, BS, JT. Literature search: SDO, JT. Writing: SDO, BS, JT. Critical review: SDO, DS, DG, JT, BS.