Objective

The aim of this study is to conduct a pilot survey to determine core anatomy content for chiropractic curriculum based on the perception of chiropractors and anatomy educators involved in teaching in an Australian chiropractic program.

Methods

A survey of anatomical structures previously used in a medical survey, with similar criteria for synthesizing responses, was used and classified according to whether the respondents rated an item as essential, important, acceptable, or not required in a chiropractic program. The item was scored as core if ≥60% of respondents rated it essential, recommended if 30%–59% rated it essential, not recommended if 20%–29% rated it essential, or not core if <20% rated it essential.

Results

The respondents rated 81.6% of all musculoskeletal concepts as core and 18.4% as recommended, 88.8% of the vertebral column items as core, and 11.2% of the items as recommended, 69.4% upper limb and pectoral girdle items as core, 23.7% of items as recommended, 5.5% as not recommended and 1.3% as not core items for inclusion, 85.3% of all lower limb and pelvic girdle items as core, 14.4% as recommended and 0.3% not recommended.

Conclusion

Chiropractors and anatomists involved in teaching in an Australian chiropractic program rated most musculoskeletal items as essential for inclusion in a chiropractic teaching program to ensure adequate preparation for safe practice and to promote alignment with the standards of anatomy education delivered into the clinical professions.

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Author notes

Rosemary Giuriato (corresponding author) is an associate professor in the Department of Chiropractic at Macquarie University and Department of Anatomy at the University of New South Wales (Level 3, Room 345, 17 Wally's Walk, NSW 2109, Australia; rosemary.giuriato@mq.edu.au). Goran Štrkalj is an associate professor in the Department of Anatomy at the University of New South Wales (Wallace Wurth Building, Room 215, Level 2 NorthWest, UNSW Sydney, NSW 2052. Australia; g.strkalj@unsw.edu.au). Tania Prvan is a senior lecturer in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Macquarie University (Level 6, Room 6.29, 12 Wally's Walk, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia; tania.pvan@mq.edu.au). Nalini Pather is a professor in the Department of Anatomy at the University of New South Wales (Wallace Wurth Building, Room 215, Level 2 NorthWest, UNSW Sydney, NSW 2052 Australia; n.pather@unsw.edu.au). This article was received June 3, 2021, revised June 29, 2021 and August 11, 2021, and accepted September 13, 2021.

Concept development: RG, NP, GS. Design: RG, NP, GS. Supervision: RG, NP, GS. Data collection/processing: RG, TP. Analysis/interpretation: RG, TP. Literature search: RG. Writing: RG. Critical review: RG, TP, NP, GS.