Objective

The global COVID-19 pandemic required the teaching of basic science instructional laboratories be done in a remote, online format termed emergency remote teaching (ERT). The aims of this study were to: (1) share strategies for ERT of basic science instructional laboratories and (2) assess student perceptions of the experience of virtual demonstrations that were recorded from the first-person perspective of the professor.

Methods

Laboratories for courses in gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, and clinical microbiology were adapted to ERT by creating videos that allowed the students to view the laboratory activities through the eyes and hands of the faculty. A unique 5-question survey instrument was created to collect students' perceptions of gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, and clinical microbiology virtual lab experiences. Percentage of responses were calculated for 4 close-ended questions. Qualitative content analysis was conducted on the single open-ended question. Two additional close-ended questions were used for assessing perception of gross anatomy labs only.

Results

Videos of gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, and clinical microbiology laboratory activities mimicked the student experience through the camera lens as labs were performed by faculty members engaged in either dissection, viewing structures or doing experiments, respectively. In all 3 basic science courses, over 70% of students strongly agreed or agreed that the videos created a sense of being in the laboratory.

Conclusion

Use of video technology allowed faculty to mimic the student experience of being in basic science laboratories, and, importantly, allowed the student to virtually participate in the learning experience.

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Author notes

Christine Major is an associate professor in the Department of Basic Sciences at the University of Western States (8000 NE Tillamook St. Portland OR, 97213; chmajor@uws.edu). William Borman is a professor in the Department of Basic Sciences at the University of Western States (8000 NE Tillamook St. Portland OR, 97213; bborman@uws.edu).

Concept development: KDB, CAM. Design: KDB, CAM, WHB. Supervision: KDB. Data collection/processing: KDB, CAM, WHB. Analysis/interpretation: KDB, CAM, WHB. Literature search: KDB, CAM. Writing: KDB, CAM, WHB. Critical review: KDB, CAM, WHB.