Ozemek and colleagues (1) have proposed that the entry-level degree for clinical exercise physiologists (CEPs) in the United States be elevated to a professional doctorate—i.e., Doctor of Clinical Exercise Physiology (DCEP). They argue that this is necessary because of an increasing focus on healthy living medicine for the primary and secondary preventive treatment of chronic diseases and to accommodate the expanding population of individuals with multiple comorbidities (1). They go on to state that elevating CEP education to a doctoral level could be beneficial to efforts aimed at obtaining CEP licensure and compensation from health insurance providers for CEP-led services (1). The didactic and practicum curriculum they propose is robust. Graduates would be well-prepared for a career as a CEP. So, is DCEP the future for CEPs, or is it fallacy?

Many health care professions in...

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