Pilkey et al. (2009) present a well-illustrated paper on a great variety of mostly inshore islands that occur in enormous numbers worldwide. My issue is mostly with the term “barrier,” questionably attached to these features. In several key points, this designation conflicts with conventional coastal terminology, indeed with the universal consensus. Some of the cited landforms are actually not islands but mainland beach ridges that fringe mangrove swamps, permafrost-thermokarst tundra (Figure 13H), or glacial sandur and/or fjord-head coastal surfaces along the mainland shore (Figure 13E). Others represent recurved sand spits, also attached to the mainland shore (e.g., Figure 5E). Those that actually are islands, located inside protected bays or offshore, often even lack rudimentary, thin, narrow, at least semicontinuous beach foreshore lithosomes.

A quick sampling of the vast modern coastal literature (e.g., Davis, 1992, 1995; Fisher, 1982; Neuendorf et al., 2005, p....

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