The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae), was initially introduced and established in the United States in Houston, TX, in international shipments of used tires (Kuno 2012, J. Med. Entomol. 49:1163–1176). In less than 40 years, its range has expanded to include the Gulf States, midwestern states north to Lake Michigan, and the east coast as far north as Boston, MA (Hawley et al. 1987, Asian Sci. 236:1114–1116). Aedes albopictus are efficient vectors for human arboviral diseases such as dengue, Zika, chikungunya, West Nile, and yellow fever (Let et al. 2018, Int. J. Infect. Dis. 67:25–35). The species shows remarkable behavioral flexibility producing strains with enhanced preference for urban habitats and human hosts. Some introduced strains are adapted to survive in a temperate climate with the ability to diapause and produce desiccation-resistant eggs.

Limitations in resources are often impediments in maintaining mosquito colonies for research purposes. Herein is...

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