Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are generated in meat during cooking, and pretreatment of meat is becoming increasingly popular. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the influence of different concentrations of three phenolic acid marinades and grilling temperature on the formation and inhibition of PAHs in charcoal-grilled chicken wings by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography–fluorescence detection and analysis of the antiradical activity of marinades by the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) method. The results showed that protocatechuic acid marinade exhibited the highest inhibitory effects, followed by gallic acid and ferulic acid marinade. Additionally, the inhibitory effects grew as the concentration of phenolic marinade increased within limits, and a plateau was eventually reached at a high concentration. Notably, we also found that PAH formation was more affected by marinating than by changing the grilling temperature. In addition, gallic acid had the strongest antiradical activity, whereas protocatechuic acid showed strong activity, and ferulic acid exhibited relativity low activity. The relationship between the antiradical activity and PAH inhibitory effects of phenolic acids suggested that the mechanism for the formation of PAHs was more complex and involved more than antiradical activity. Further studies are needed to test more types and contents of phenolic acid for inhibition of PAH formation.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • PAH formation was more affected by marinating than by changing the grilling temperature.

  • Inhibitory effects grew as the concentration of phenolic marinade increased within limits.

  • The antiradical activity and the inhibition of PAHs formation have no direct relation.

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