ABSTRACT

Food allergic reactions frequently occur in ethnic restaurants. However, effective training materials specific to food allergies have not been readily available to employees. The objectives of the study were to investigate employee self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment on the basis of individual and operational factors and what variables, among self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment, are associated with the employee's intention to reduce risky behavior when handling food allergies in ethnic restaurants. A total of 256 employees who had or are currently working in ethnic restaurants and had direct contact with food or customers participated in this study through the Amazon Mechanical Turk Web site from October 2020 to April 2021. The statistical analysis results showed that employee self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment vary on the basis of gender, food safety certification, training, and availability of menu items for customers with food allergies. In addition, employee self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment are positively correlated with employee's risk reduction behavior for food allergies. The results of the study will provide practical guidelines for developing more multidimensional training programs specific to food allergies in ethnic restaurants.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment differ on the basis of individual factors.

  • Self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment differ on the basis of operational factors.

  • Self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility, and commitment were identified as motivational factors.

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