Q fever is an infectious disease of man. It is found as an inapparent infection in animals. Cattle, sheep, and goats are found widely infected in nature and are probably the source of the organisms infecting man. These animals shed the organism in their milk which introduces it into the environment of man. It has been demonstrated that the rickettsiae of Q fever may survive present day pasteurization procedures.

This manuscript presents preliminary data of the survival of this organism when suspended in milk and subjected to various time-temperature combinations within the pasteurization range.

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Author notes

*Presented before the Milk Section Meeting of the 39th Annual Convention of the International Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians, Inc. in Minneapolis, Minnesota, September 19, 1952.

1Department of Veterinary Public Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California.

2U.S.P.H.S., Environmental Health Center, assigned to Q fever pasteurization study.

3U.S.P.H.S., Communicable Disease Center, assigned to Q fever pasteurization study.

Doctor John B. Enright is Chairman of the Department of Veterinary Public Health School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California. He received his Ph.D. degree from Stanford University in 1947. Later he was acting assistant chief of the Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory California State Department of Public Health.

His work has been in the field of viral and rickettsial diseases more specifically poliomyelitis, encephalitis and Q fever.