Pork from pigs experimentally infected with Trichinella spiralis was used to manufacture Genoa salami. In Experiment I, Genoa salami was formulated to include: (a) in-going sodium chloride of 2.00 or 3.33% based on raw meat weight; (b) either commercial starter culture or no starter culture and held for fermentation at either 35°C (95°F) or 46.1 °C (115°F). Lower water activity (aw) was found (P<0.0001) in salami manufactured either with 3.33% salt or processed by high fermentation temperature. Lower pH values resulted from use of a starter culture. An interaction between salt concentration and fermentation temperature was seen after 20 days of drying. Salt concentration appeared to exert a definite effect of trichina viability. In Experiment II, Genoa salami was formulated to include: (a) in-going sodium chloride of 0.00, 1.67 or 3.33% based on raw meat weight; (b) all salami contained starter culture and held for fermentation at 46.1 °C. Salami made with 3.33% salt had higher pH and lower aw values than did that made with no or 1.67% salt. The salt content and drying time interaction was greatest in salami made with 3.33% salt. The 3.33% salt content also appeared to exert a definite effect on trichina viability.

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Author notes

1Department of Veterinary Public Health.

2Department of Animal Science.

3Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology.