The widespread presence of Salmonella in all phases of broiler chicken production and processing is well documented. However, little information is available to indicate the identity and movement of specific serotypes of Salmonella through the different phases of an integrated operation. In this study, samples were collected from the breeder farm, from the hatchery, from the previous grow-out flock, from the flock during grow-out, and from carcasses after processing. Salmonella were recovered from 6, 98, 24, 60, and 7% of the samples, respectively, in the first trial and from 7, 98, 26, 22, and 36% of the samples, respectively, in the second trial. Seven different serotypes were identified in the first trial, and 12 different serotypes were identified in the second trial. For both trials there was poor correlation between the serotypes found in the breeder farms and those found in the hatchery. This finding and the fact that similar serotypes were found in the hatchery in both trials suggests that there was an endemic population of Salmonella in the hatchery. An association between the serotypes found in the hatchery and those found on the final processed carcasses was observed in both trials. This study confirms that a successful intervention program for broiler production operations must be multifaceted, with one component being disinfection in the hatchery.

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