This article shares a school based inquiry project undertaken by staff in a special day school in the North Island of New Zealand supported by an external teacher educator/ researcher from the United States. The inquiry project followed the Accessible Research Cycle (Jones, Whitehurst, & Egerton, 2012), which is a phased progression of questions that supports teacher-led inquiry in schools:

The project involved structured interviewing with nine mentors/mentees. The impetus for the project emerged through a discussion with teachers about a shared interest across the school. The project focussed on the mentoring program in the school that included experienced as well as novice teachers. This article contributes to understandings of mentoring, particularly for teachers of students with complex disabilities from the perspectives of mentees and mentors, gathered through structured interviews. It offers insights into mentors' and mentees' perspectives about essential knowledge, skills and dispositions involved in mentoring....

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