Abstract

There is limited recognition of the concept of self-determination in Middle Eastern cultures. Consequently, there are no adapted measures of self-determination for Arabic adolescents with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, or multiple disabilities (intellectual disability and physical impairment). The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency reliability and construct validity of a translated and adapted version of the Arc's Self-Determination Scale. The participants in this study were 364 Saudi female adolescents between 14 and 22 years old who had intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, or multiple disabilities and were enrolled in educational organizations in Saudi Arabia. An Arabic version of the Arc's Self-Determination Scale was translated and back-translated by the researchers and then refined and validated by a panel of experts. The translated and adapted Arc's self-determination scale was administered to the participants by their teachers at their schools. Thirty-four items were deleted from the scale, and seven items were modified by the researchers because they were culturally inappropriate. Factorial analysis showed proof of construct validity. The findings of this study showed that the translated and adapted version of the Arc's Self-Determination Scale is a validated assessment within Saudi culture; however, further validation studies with larger samples are needed. This study replicated the findings of previous studies with an international sample and confirmed the universality of the concept of self-determination as well as differences in the operationalization of the self-determination construct across cultures.

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