Honey has many unique chemical and physical properties that make approaches to studying it incredibly diverse. Evaluating the precise composition of honey is done through a variety of methods, but is most commonly done by simply observing shades of color or by noting bee behavior surrounding a hive. While both methods are relatively simple, they are not deemed reliable; by bringing in a DNA-based method, the confirmation of a monofloral source becomes more credible and easily replicated. During this research, three methods of confirming honey content were employed ranging from simple color identification, to labor-intensive pollen counting, and finally the use of DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification. PCR primers targeted the ITS2 gene sequence, known for its specificity for plant identification. All three aforementioned methods were carried out on three highly-coveted honey types and performed in replicates. The ease of replication during pollen counting and color identification proved to...

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