The use of cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) in implantology has the advantage of allowing the visualization of structures without overlap, and therefore, it provides a closer replication of the anatomic truth. Moreover, it enables a better comparison of the outcomes when scans are taken of the same area before and after the procedure. However, to more accurately compare such images, a reliable method of superimposition is needed. In the fields of oral and maxillofacial surgery and orthodontics, the techniques of accurate superimposition have been studied and extensively validated.2–5  However, these techniques require the inclusion of the cranial base in the CBCT scan and therefore result in a large field of view (FOV) when assessing changes in the maxilla or the mandible, as well as involve a relatively large amount of radiation for the patient. In implantology, the area being evaluated is often smaller, requiring a...

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