A variety of protocols have been introduced for restoring the ridge contours of periodontally compromised teeth to be extracted.1–3  In the literature, the most common modality for this is a guided bone regeneration procedure after a sufficient healing period following tooth extraction. However, nonintervened healing after extracting a periodontally compromised tooth sometimes leads to a huge loss of not only hard tissue but also soft tissue.

The clinical benefits of alveolar ridge preservation were recently highlighted, especially as it demonstrates a reduced odds ratio of hard-tissue augmentation at the time of implant placement compared with nonintervened healing. Despite a heterogeneity of ridge preservation procedures, ridge preservation always requires meticulous debridement of the socket to expose sound socket walls. Such is based on the belief that the socket-lining soft tissue is infected granulation tissue, which has been applied to minimally destructive sockets (less than...

You do not currently have access to this content.